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All reviews - DVDs (7)

Tomorrow When the War Began review

Posted : 5 years, 1 month ago on 19 May 2012 08:08 (A review of Tomorrow When the War Began )

Tomorrow, When the War Began is a 2010 Australian adventure film written and directed by Stuart Beattie and based on the novel of the same name (the first in a series of seven) by John Marsden. The film is produced by Andrew Mason and Michael Boughen. The story follows Ellie Linton, one of eight teenagers waging a guerrilla war against an invading foreign power in their fictional hometown of Wirrawee. The film stars Caitlin Stasey as Ellie Linton and features an ensemble cast that includes Rachel Hurd-Wood, Lincoln Lewis and Phoebe Tonkin.

Production began in September 2009.[7][8][9] Principal photography began on 28 September 2009, and concluded on 6 November 2009; filming took place in the Hunter Region and the Blue Mountains, in New South Wales.

The teaser trailer for the film was released on 31 March 2010. The film was released in Australia and New Zealand on 2 September 2010[10][11] and was released in the UK on 8 April 2011.[3]



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Blackthorn review

Posted : 5 years, 3 months ago on 2 March 2012 05:43 (A review of Blackthorn)

In Bolivia, Butch Cassidy (now calling himself James Blackthorne) pines for one last sight of home, an adventure that aligns him with a young robber and makes the duo a target for gangs and lawmen alike.



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Another Earth review

Posted : 5 years, 4 months ago on 15 February 2012 04:09 (A review of Another Earth )

Mike Cahill’s directorial feature-film debut sounds like a science-fiction movie, but it’s not. Yes, it features the appearance in the sky of an Earth identical to our own, one populated by doppelgangers who may or may not have made the same decisions we have. And yes, it won the Alfred P. Sloan Feature Film Prize, which goes to movies that focus on science or technology, at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, where it was one of the most talked-about movies. And yes, the dialogue sometimes bandies about concepts like synchronicity (sometimes annoyingly so).

Media
Another Earth: The official trailer But more than anything, the metaphysics function as a metaphor in what’s an affecting – if slow-moving – drama about having to live with the choices we make and our need to find redemption.

Rhoda Williams (Brit Marling) is 17 and at a party celebrating her acceptance to MIT, where she plans to study astrophysics, on the night the other Earth first appears in the sky. Driving home drunk, she stares out the window to get a glimpse of the planet and plows into a family in another car, killing the wife and child and leaving the husband, a composer named John Burroughs (William Mapother), in a coma.

Four years later, Rhoda is released from prison. She moves in to a bare room in her parents’ attic and takes a job as a janitor at a high school because she doesn’t want to have to talk to people. Desperate to be forgiven, she tracks down Burroughs, who has since awoken and mopes around his filthy farmhouse in his bathrobe. He doesn’t recognize Rhoda. And while she knows she should apologize, she can’t. Instead, she tells Burroughs she works for a cleaning company and he’s won a free trial. He invites her in, and she begins washing the dishes.

The other Earth is still up there in the sky, although, oddly, no one’s making much of a fuss about it. There is one crazy man in a tinfoil helmet on the street raving about the planet, one of the movie’s few false notes (crazy or not, does anyone seriously wear tinfoil hats?). There’s also a janitor Rhoda works with who’s more of a spirit guide created for narrative purposes than an actual person.

Rhoda stares up longingly at the other Earth, which provides plenty of conversational fodder for her and Burroughs. What would you say if you met another you? “Better luck next time,” Rhoda says. But maybe on that other Earth, Rhoda never got into the accident. Maybe on that other Earth, Burroughs’s family is still alive. But if you met a doppelganger, would you even recognize yourself?

It’s heady stuff, and the script by Cahill and Marling can plod along like a philosophy lecture. It’s slow-going, often ponderous and raises more questions than it answers. It even references Plato’s allegory of the cave, a requisite for any smarty pants wondering about the nature of reality. But in a summer dominated by wizards and warring robots from outer space, it’s refreshing to see a movie tackling difficult ideas, even if, like the new Earth, it sometimes feels like the filmmakers have their heads up in the clouds.

Thankfully, it’s anchored by two great performances and pulled along by the tension of what will happen when Burroughs learns his housekeeper’s true identity. Marling spends most of the film in a silent daze, but her every facial gesture and tentative move registers her character’s guilt, while Mapother is brilliant as a man festering in tragedy. The two may find love and redemption in one another, but you know the truth will eventually come out.

When Rhoda wins a contest to go to the other Earth, she finally has the chance to resolve all the questions that have been plaguing her. Will she go? There’s an excellent twist ending that proves that sometimes you can find the right answers even if you’ve been asking the wrong questions all along


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Another Earth review

Posted : 5 years, 4 months ago on 15 February 2012 04:08 (A review of Another Earth )

Mike Cahill’s directorial feature-film debut sounds like a science-fiction movie, but it’s not. Yes, it features the appearance in the sky of an Earth identical to our own, one populated by doppelgangers who may or may not have made the same decisions we have. And yes, it won the Alfred P. Sloan Feature Film Prize, which goes to movies that focus on science or technology, at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, where it was one of the most talked-about movies. And yes, the dialogue sometimes bandies about concepts like synchronicity (sometimes annoyingly so).

Media
Another Earth: The official trailer But more than anything, the metaphysics function as a metaphor in what’s an affecting – if slow-moving – drama about having to live with the choices we make and our need to find redemption.

Rhoda Williams (Brit Marling) is 17 and at a party celebrating her acceptance to MIT, where she plans to study astrophysics, on the night the other Earth first appears in the sky. Driving home drunk, she stares out the window to get a glimpse of the planet and plows into a family in another car, killing the wife and child and leaving the husband, a composer named John Burroughs (William Mapother), in a coma.

Four years later, Rhoda is released from prison. She moves in to a bare room in her parents’ attic and takes a job as a janitor at a high school because she doesn’t want to have to talk to people. Desperate to be forgiven, she tracks down Burroughs, who has since awoken and mopes around his filthy farmhouse in his bathrobe. He doesn’t recognize Rhoda. And while she knows she should apologize, she can’t. Instead, she tells Burroughs she works for a cleaning company and he’s won a free trial. He invites her in, and she begins washing the dishes.

The other Earth is still up there in the sky, although, oddly, no one’s making much of a fuss about it. There is one crazy man in a tinfoil helmet on the street raving about the planet, one of the movie’s few false notes (crazy or not, does anyone seriously wear tinfoil hats?). There’s also a janitor Rhoda works with who’s more of a spirit guide created for narrative purposes than an actual person.

Rhoda stares up longingly at the other Earth, which provides plenty of conversational fodder for her and Burroughs. What would you say if you met another you? “Better luck next time,” Rhoda says. But maybe on that other Earth, Rhoda never got into the accident. Maybe on that other Earth, Burroughs’s family is still alive. But if you met a doppelganger, would you even recognize yourself?

It’s heady stuff, and the script by Cahill and Marling can plod along like a philosophy lecture. It’s slow-going, often ponderous and raises more questions than it answers. It even references Plato’s allegory of the cave, a requisite for any smarty pants wondering about the nature of reality. But in a summer dominated by wizards and warring robots from outer space, it’s refreshing to see a movie tackling difficult ideas, even if, like the new Earth, it sometimes feels like the filmmakers have their heads up in the clouds.

Thankfully, it’s anchored by two great performances and pulled along by the tension of what will happen when Burroughs learns his housekeeper’s true identity. Marling spends most of the film in a silent daze, but her every facial gesture and tentative move registers her character’s guilt, while Mapother is brilliant as a man festering in tragedy. The two may find love and redemption in one another, but you know the truth will eventually come out.

When Rhoda wins a contest to go to the other Earth, she finally has the chance to resolve all the questions that have been plaguing her. Will she go? There’s an excellent twist ending that proves that sometimes you can find the right answers even if you’ve been asking the wrong questions all along


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the kate logan affair review

Posted : 5 years, 5 months ago on 21 January 2012 03:46 (A review of the kate logan affair)

A young psychologically unstable young police woman named Kate Logan and a married Frenchman find themselves caught up in a dramatic twisted affair.



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Tenderness review

Posted : 7 years, 1 month ago on 6 May 2010 05:40 (A review of Tenderness)

After several years of juvenile incarceration for the horrific murders of his parents, Eric Poole (Jon Foster) is released back into the world amidst much controversy. While dealing with his wife's terminal condition, Retired Detective Cristofuoro (Russell Crowe) keeps close watch on Eric after his release waiting for him to slip up. Shortly after returning to his Aunt's home, Eric sets off to Albany to look at colleges. Suspecting that there is more to the trip that Eric is letting on, Eric's Aunt Teresa (Laura Dern) notifies the Detective of the trip. Fueled by an obsession by a seemingly chance encounter with Eric before the murders, a young and immature teen, Lori (Sophie Traub), forces a second encounter and finds herself accompanying Eric on his journey all while both searching for their own version of tenderness.

While it's no secret that this is not a perfect film, there is something to be said about this adaptation of Robert Cormier's novel. Instead of drawing from high suspense of the occurring events and without spelling everything out for the audience like most American films, Australian director Polson focuses on studying the film's characters. Though the characterization is a worthy effort, I still felt that the full potential of each character's depth was not explored. As long as you can get past Polson's earlier work and view the film with an open mind, you should be able to enjoy 'Tenderness' for as much as I did.


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The Black Hole

Posted : 10 years, 9 months ago on 15 September 2006 01:02 (A review of The Black Hole)

Description:
It's 2 A.M. in St Louis when a routine scientific experiment goes terribly wrong and an explosion shakes the city. A scientific team investigates, clashing with an intergalactic, voltage-devouring creature that vaporizes them.


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